Malnutrition in Third World Countries

by Admin on November 1, 2013

malnutrition-1

Malnutrition  is a global issue  that has been present for  decades, killing more people  than AIDs, malaria, and  tuberculosis combined each  year(world food programme).  Malnutrition can be defined as the lack of proper nutrition, inadequate or unbalanced nutrition (dictionary.com). Those who do not get proper nutrition, weather its too little, too much, or the wrong kind are also considered malnourished. There is enough food in the world to feed the entire population, yet that there are still millions in third world countries starving to death.

Malnutrition is a serious epidemic: 842 million people around the world do not have enough to eat, 827 million live in developing countries where 14.3% of the population is undernourished ( world food programme). Asia tops all others with the largest hungry population at a whopping 552 million. Malnourished and undernourished deaths account for 45% of children under five. In developing countries underweight children are genuine concern, there are approximately 100 million children underweight, and to put that in perspective that is 1 out of 6 children (world food programme). Those who are malnourished have trouble functioning day to day, fighting disease and infection, and most physical activity become extremely challenging. For women pregnancy becomes a huge risk, due to their inability to sustain adequate nutrition or obtain prenatal vitamins.

Malnutrition affects a little more than 147 million pre-schoolers in developing countries, affecting their physical and mental development at such a young age (world food programme). Malnutrition is even know to have side effects rapid hair loss and distended stomachs (PubMed Health). Studies have shown that one out of every 3 children in the developing world are undernourished, which puts them at risk for diet-related chronic diseases, such as coronary heart disease and hypertension, otherwise knows as high blood pressure (IFPRI). Malnutrition is an increasing epidemic in third world countries, over 5 million people in the African , Asian, and Latin American countries are in absolute poverty ( world hunger), meaning an income where minimal food, clothing, and shelter are obtained (Encyclo).

The World Health Organization estimates that one-third of the global population is well-feed, one-third under-feed, and the other third is starving. Two thirds of the global population is struggling to obtain the proper nutrients to sustain a healthy, well-balanced, and nourished lifestyle. Three billion people world wide struggle to survive on two dollars a day and about 183 million children are underweight. Lucky in 1997 a vitamin A supplement program saved 300,000 young children in developing countries. This program saved 300,000 people in one year alone, if these programs could continue around the globe, the death rates from malnutrition would greatly decrease.

According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s newest food guide ,MyPlate, a healthy balanced meal is based on proper serving sizes. MyPlate says that half your plate should be filled with fruit and vegetables and the other half should be grains and protein, however 50% or more of your grains should be whole grains as well as a glass of milk preferably low-fat or fat-free(ChooseMyPlate.gov). Only 1-3% of the global population eats according to this diagram, however this is an extremely difficult way to eat if you do not have the means to do so.

 Malnutrition

Works Cited

“ChooseMyPlate.gov.” ChooseMyPlate.gov. N.p., n.d. Web. 01 Nov. 2013. <http://www.choosemyplate.gov/>.

“Malnutrition.” Dictionary.com. Dictionary.com, n.d. Web. 31 Oct. 2013. <http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/malnutrition ?s=t>.

NCBI. U.S. National Library of Medicine, n.d. Web. 01 Nov. 2013. <http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0001441/>.

“Publications.” Explaining Child Malnutrition in Developing Countries. N.p., n.d. Web. 01 Nov. 2013. <http://www.ifpri.org/publication/explaining-child-malnutrition-developing-countries-0>.

“World Food Programme Fighting Hunger Worldwide.” What Is Malnutrition? N.p., n.d. Web. 31 Oct. 2013. <http://www.wfp.org/hunger/malnutrition>.

“The World Hunger Problem: Facts, Figures Andstatistics.” ThinkQuest. Oracle Foundation, n.d. Web. 01 Nov. 2013. <http://library.thinkquest.org/C002291/high/present/stats.htm>.

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{ 1 comment… read it below or add one }

Lauren Spooner November 1, 2013 at 11:28 pm

I agree that this a very important issue it is terrifying to see that children that have no control over their lives yet are suffering so badly and not to mention that no human being should be going through something like this. I also like how you added the Myplate information to help others.

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